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Allgäu

Allgäu

In the summer, the Allgäu region is one of Germany’s most picturesque with lush green pastures and herds of grazing cattle. The Allgäu is full of charming little cities such as Lindau, Memmingen and Kempton. The austere remoteness and pleasant quietness of these towns are what capture tourists. In the winter the Allgäu is also a popular destination, thanks to skiing and winter sports in the nearby Alps. Oberstdorf, a quaint town of 10,000 sitting at the foot of the Bavarian Alps, is a popular destination for winter sports enthusiasts. It is also the gateway to the Kleinwalsertal, a tucked-away Austrian valley that is accessible only through (and completely dependent upon) its northern neighbor.
www.allgaeu.de
Photo: Allgäu Marketing GmbH

Bavarian National Forest

The Bavarian National Forest sits along Bavaria’s eastern border with the Czech Republic. From Munich it is easily accessed via the A92 and from Regensburg with the A3. Since 1970, the forest has been classified as a national park – Germany’s first. Guests and visitors can avail themselves of a myriad of recreational activities. The towns of Zwiesel, Frauenau and Spiegelau are popular overnight locations, each boasting a range of accommodations from campsites to wellness hotels. Some 300 kilometers of walking and hiking trails and over 200 kilometers of bicycle paths allow for incredible wilderness experiences.
Tel: 08552 – 960 00
www.nationalpark-bayerischer-wald.de

Chiemsee

Chiemsee

Also referred to as “The Bavarian Sea,” the Chiemsee is Bavaria’s largest fresh water lake. Fed by the Tiroler Achen and Prien rivers and boasting nearly 65 kilometers of shore length, the Chiemsee has a well-deserved reputation for water recreation. The beaches at Gstadt and Chieming are free of charge and easily accessible. Boats can also be rented at these beaches for 10 to 20 euros per hour. You can also visit the island of Herrenchiemsee and Ludwig II’s palace of the same name, which was his humble attempt to outshine Versailles. Ludwig, already well known for his carefree spending, managed to spend more on this palace than on Neuschwanstein and Linderhof combined. Its rooms are lavishly decorated, each one outdoing the next in decorum and pomposity. The lake’s other island is the Frauenchiemsee. Home to the 8th century Frauenwörth Abbey, this island is worth a visit, if for no other reason than to sample the famous Klösterlikör and Marzipan.
www.chiemsee.de
Photo: Bayern Tourismus Marketing GmbH

Coburg

Coburg

High up in the northern reaches of Bavaria’s Franconian region is the city of Coburg. This former independent duchy didn’t become a part of Bavaria until 1920. The rulers of Coburg had little cause for concern – through a series of marriages over the course of hundreds of years, the Coburg royal family developed connections with eight European dynasties, including the Windsor family of Great Britain. What brings visitors to Coburg today is the lofty fortress in which the political intrigue of these powerful Franconians played out. The Veste Coburg, with its triple-ring fortifications and imposing medieval towers, is a must-see. The fortress houses an amazing art collection featuring artists such as Rembrandt, Dürer and Cranach the Elder. During the early stages of the Protestant Reformation, Martin Luther even spent six months hidden behind its protective walls.
www.coburg-tourist.de
Photo: Tourismusverband Franken e.V.

Dachau Concentration Camp

Dachau Concentration Camp

The first of numerous concentration camps erected by the Nazis is located in the city of Dachau, about 20 minutes northwest of Munich. Built in 1933 under the orders of Heinrich Himmler, the camp served as a prison for nearly 200,000 political and social “deviants” during the Third Reich, and about 32,000 inmates died during captivity. Despite the encroaching modern housing developments, the site has remained intact in scale and is a harrowing memorial for Holocaust victims. Most importantly, the site also seeks to convey an educational element to the unfathomable tragedy. A documentary exhibit featuring photographs, texts and artifacts revisits the horrifying aspects of camp life with astounding clarity. Information is available in at least a dozen languages. Guided tours are also popular, but make sure to set up your tour with the memorial staff and not an unauthorized guide.
Tel: 08131 – 669 970
Alte Römerstraße 75, Dachau
www.kz-gedenkstaette-dachau.de
Photo: CC/Muu-karhu

German Alpine Road

German Alpine Road

Stretching nearly 450 kilometers from the city of Lindau on Lake Constance to Berchtesgaden on Lake Königssee, the German Alpine Road offers fantastic views of Germany’s higher altitudes. This is Sound of Music territory, with craggy peaks, lush meadows and alpine vistas. The route passes through quaint Bavarian villages and past historical castles, but you can also stop and rest at one of the 20 lakes along the way. Bicyclists are also able to make use of the route, with many of the bed and breakfasts catering to their needs. Hiking routes along the road are also plentiful. It is always a good idea to familiarize yourself with the dangers of mountain driving before you begin.
www.deutschealpenstrasse.de
Photo: Bayern Tourismus Marketing GmbH

Neuschwanstein

Schloss Neuschwanstein

Walt Disney was so enamored with this 19th century palace that the centerpiece of the Magic Kingdom is modelled after Schloss Neuschwanstein. King Ludwig II built the castle as an ode to composer Richard Wagner and as a personal summer retreat. Construction began in 1868, but it wasn’t until Ludwig died 20 years later that the castle was opened to the public. Over one million tourists visit the castle each year, which is perched in the Alps between Hohenschwangau and Füssen. The Swan Castle is one of the most lucrative tourism sites in Germany. Last year it was selected as one of the contenders for the New Seven Wonders of the World. Although Ludwig wanted to make his castle a temple to the medieval lore of Germany, the building is actually a marvel of late 19th century technology, including electricity, steam engine power and piped heating.
Tel: 08362 – 930 830
www.neuschwanstein.de
Photo: Bayern Tourismus Marketing GmbH

Rothenburg

Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Rothenburg is a medieval city in Middle Franconia and one of Bavaria’s most treasured historical centers. A large portion of the old city is car-free, making it a perfect destination for day-trippers and those looking to leave the hustle and bustle of nearby cities. Rothenburg is named after the red-roofed buildings that dot the city. An Imperial Free City during the Holy Roman Empire, it is currently in the Ansbach district. The town is located on the Romantic Road, Germany’s line of towns and villages that have preserved their medieval accoutrements in the 21st century. Visitors can still visit the medieval city wall, as well as the St. Peter and Paul Church. Built in 968, the edifice is the only Romanesque church in Franconia.
www.rothenburg.de
Photo: Bayern Tourismus Marketing GmbH

Our Featured Event

On Monday 4 December, we will have a very special International Stammtisch with cast members "Jekyll & Hyde" Musical from the English Theatre. Cast members will peform some of the hit songs from the show. Based on Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic story about a brilliant mind gone awry, Jekyll & Hyde runs from 11 Nov. to 11 Feb. 2018.

 

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